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Gibson Star Basket for 4 or 4.25″ Commander 1911. ***SOLD!***.

Gibson Gunleather and Bruce Gibson Design hand-stamped Star Basket, right-hand, high-ride belt slide pancake holster for the Commander length 1911 with 4, or 4.25-inch barrels.

The Star Basket pattern and border is not embossed–it is laid out and hand-stamped one tiny star at a time.  This process takes time, and hand-crafted attention to detail.

The sight track is molded in to accommodate the larger sights on modern pistols, and the stitching is flared to eliminate “sticking” or hanging up on the draw.

Retention is excellent.  Suitable for open or concealed carry.

Full trigger guard coverage, and cutaway for a comfortable, full-firing grip while holstered.

This holster is designed to fit dual-layer gun belts 1.5″ wide, and 1/4″ thick. This is a high-ride, open carry or concealed holster with a 15-degree muzzle-rear rake or cant.

The Natural oil finish will darken somewhat over time with exposure to sunlight.  A lot of folks describe this as “patina,” and it’s a really cool natural occurrence with veg-tan leather.

All we use is Premium American Hermann Oak vegetable tanned leather.  All proudly made in the USA.  Hermann Oak has been in the leather business in St. Louis, Missouri since 1881.  There is none better.

Heavy wheat colored nylon machine stitching.

Hand-fitted and hand-detailed. Holster edges are hand-beveled, waxed, finished, and burnished.

This holster is in-stock and ships via US Postal Service Priority Mail with delivery confirmation.

Satisfaction is guaranteed.

Replica gun, mags and other goodies are not included.

Questions are always welcome! And again, satisfaction is guaranteed.

Thank you for looking!

$125.00 with Free Priority Mail shipping with Delivery Confirmation and tracking.

***SOLD***

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“Thin Blue Line” leather cuff bracelet.

I didn’t have a clue that this item would get the attention it has.  We’ve added it to the Shop, so if you want one, you can click the link below and have a look for information and ordering.

We’ll have a size/sizing chart put together shortly, but in the meantime, just measure around your wrist OVER your wrist bone, and we’ll build it from there.

Here’s the link to the “Thin Blue Line” cuff bracelet:  https://www.brucegibsondesign.com/product/gibson-leather-cuff-bracelet-thin-blue-line-2-wide/

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Gibson Saltillo Star Basket Leather Gun Belt. Hand stamped and handmade in the good ol’ USA.

GIBSON SALTILLO 1.5" LEATHER GUN BELT GUNBELT HANDMADE HAND STAMPED CARVED HERMANN OAK

The credit for this idea goes to a long-time customer.  I happen to love it–thanks, Mike!

This is one of our 1-1/2″ wide, dual-layer (lined) leather gunbelts.  It’s a cool color we call “Saltillo” for the deep red highlights.  This one is hand stamped with the Barry King star basket stamp, one tiny little star at a time.  The border is also a Barry King stamp.  Stitching is heavy white nylon.  The hand-stamped leather keeper is hand finished, and hand molded to fit this belt.  It’s also hand sewn with linen thread in order to avoid a metal staple, which would corrode over time and make a mess of the works.  The edges are beveled by hand, painstakingly dyed by hand, then waxed and burnished to a fine polish.  There are seven (7) adjustment holes spaced 3/4″ apart.  It’s topped off with a heavy, polished solid brass Weaver buckle, and two floral brass Chicago screws.

If you want one of your very own, please feel free to order below.

If you have questions, shoot me an email to BruceGibson@aol.com, or use the contact form below.

$195.00 plus $12.95 USPS Priority Mail Shipping, Insured with Delivery Confirmation/Tracking.  Total is $207.95  (Florida Orders please contact me for Sales Tax).

***ADVANCE ORDERS ARE CLOSED***

 

 

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Rockmount. Jack Weil. And another Glock holster seeking a home. (G3)

You’re supposed to keep yourself limited in topic–keep it simple.  Don’t be confusing.  “Those are the rules.”  Well, I think most folks are smarter than that.

We’ve got another in-stock holster for sale, and I was thinking about the late founder of Denver, Colorado-based Rockmount Ranch Wear, Jack Weil.  Jack passed away back in 2008 at the age of 107.  We never met, but I think Jack was a cool ol’ dude.

[kad_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wb4F_D7qNK4″ ]

In this interview he talks about Denver “way back when.”  He also touches on New Englanders…”You could always tell a New Englander…you just couldn’t tell ’em a goddamn thing.”  I recall an interview where a reporter asked him about his legacy.  The reporter asked, “How would you like to be remembered?”  Jack’s response was, “I don’t give a damn.”  They don’t make ’em like that anymore.

Anyway, back to clearing out our in-stock holster collection.  All handmade, with insane attention to detail.

gibson, Glock, holster, leather, 19, 23, 32, OWB, premium, leather
Gibson outside the waistband (OWB), Natural Oil, Hermann Oak Premium American Leather Holster. Handmade in the USA.

As I mentioned yesterday, I’ve been going through all the in-stock holsters I have around here, and I’ll be putting them up as time permits.  This one’s a right-hand, belt-slide or pancake for the Glock 19, 23 or 32.  Belt slots are designed for a 1-1/2″ wide, dual-layer (doubled) gunbelt.  This one rides nice and high, with a 15-degree muzzle-rear rake.  Natural oil, premium American-tanned Hermann Oak leather, and heavy white nylon stitching.  Maker stamped on the face.  As always, the Glock in the photo’s not included.

The holster in the photo above is the one you will receive.  Any questions, feel free to shoot me an e-mail to BruceGibson@aol.com .

In the event of mutual purchasers, the first one gets it.  All others will be immediately refunded.

$100.00 via the PayPal “Buy Now” button below.  Shipping included via USPS Priority Mail to all 50 states.  *If you’re in Florida we have to add $6.00 for the required sales tax contribution to the State.  (Florida buyers I’ll send a PayPal invoice for $6.00 to cover sales tax).

Satisfaction Guaranteed.

 

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Sewing machines, stitchers, profanity & thoughts of violence.

dscn3647

 

DISCLAIMER:  The following article contains profanity.  Cuss words.  Depending on your level of tolerance, you may or may not be offended.  No discussion of leather machinery, particularly leather stitching machines, can be had without cussing.  No honest discussions, at least.  Sincere apology, in advance.   

If you’re in the leather business, or leaning that way, sooner or later you’ll deal with what I’d call the nightmare that shits on the dream.  It’s all fun and games until you get your first leather sewing machine, or “stitcher.”  I say your first because there can never be just one.

You will get one.  You’ll begin to covet, to justify, to shop around.  You’ll convince yourself that your work will improve, become more consistent, and a hundred times more efficient.  The math will prove, again and again, that a powered leather-stitching behemoth is an absolute necessity.  For my part, I would agree.

Over a decade ago, I had to have one.  The big, grey Asian-import beast arrived from China by way of California on an 18-wheeler that was unable to navigate the two-rut sand trail that I live on.  A friend with a hardware store and a forklift lifted the pallet-strapped monster into the back of my pickup truck, and I brought the 750-pound monster home.

I was excited.  My wife, not so much.  They say “ignorance is bliss,” and when it’s applied to heavy leather stitching machines, they’re not far off.  I think that wives have a sixth sense about stupid shit their husbands do/buy/collect.

This being Florida, the weather was perfect for my new arrival.  Around 150-degrees Fahrenheit, and sauna-level humidity with intense, roasting fire ants with a magnifying glass, sunshine.  “Sunshine.”  It looks like such a happy word.  It’s not.

Long story short, I got the beast off the pallet, all assembled, plugged in, and tested.  She worked perfectly.  Beautiful, snug, six stitches per inch through over ¼ inch of Hermann Oak’s finest veg-tan leather.  I was soaked with sweat, dehydrated, having visions and passing out, but I was ecstatic.  This was the most beautiful, grey hunk of cast iron I’d ever seen.  So what if she dripped oil like an old Harley, and kinda stunk a little.

In my little corner of the leather world there are four of these babies.  Three that make my life a living hell, and one that gathers cobwebs in my barn.

My favorite one, is the one in the barn.  It’s also the only one made in America, but that was many, many years ago, and we don’t do that anymore.  Make sewing machines, that is.  I digress.

Holsters and belts are a large part of what I do.  I use these oil-soaked, needle-bending, unpredictable machines for the stitching on these products.  In general, the stitcher isn’t called on to do anything until all the high-stress, creative, fine work is done.  The stamping, the floral carving, the creasing, the dyeing.  In other words, when you reach the point of maximum time and money invested in an item, it’s time to sew it.  Hours, usually, have been spent getting everything as perfect as you can.  Hours…

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Now it’s time to entrust your creative treasure to the beast.  You’ve cleaned it, oiled it, threaded it carefully, checked the bobbin—twice.  Checked the bobbin again, and checked the needle…again.  You’ve talked to it gently, encouragingly.  You have looked this soulless chunk of cast iron evil over for any potential problem.  Prayed, cursed that you had to go through all this preparation, then prayed some more and begged forgiveness for the earlier cursing and frustration.

But wait, there’s another step.  Scrap leather—test pieces.  Always run a few test pieces.  Never just turn the machine on and sew something.  Never.

Your test pieces will be perfect.  99.999% of the time.  Perfect.  Back and front.  Ahhh, life is good.  The miracle of the lockstitch.  Chinese engineering.  That’s why they’re called test pieces.  Because they will be perfect.  Not just damn good…PERFECT.

Now for the product—the holster, the belt, whatever.  It doesn’t matter.  Hold your breath (even if it takes 20-minutes for this stitch job).  Breathing can piss off the stitcher gods.  Set the needle, decide you don’t want the bulk of a backstitch, and touch the foot pedal.  Walk that baby, slow.  Ignore the fraying of the thread…one stitch and you can fix that at the end—just don’t…please don’t let it break.  Ahhh…son of a b—no, it’s okay.  Three stitches down, backside should be good, let go of the thread, pause a second and steal a breath to make the spots and faintness go away.  Wipe your sweaty, machine oil-drenched palms on your pants.  Try not to hyperventilate, and start again.  Don’t look ahead of your stitch line, take it slow, don’t worry about the cramp in your leg.  Focus.  Ignore the pain.  Be thankful there’s no blood—yet.

Done!  Finally!  Still conscious!  It doesn’t look that bad.  It doesn’t look that great, either.  Cut the threads—leave enough to pull them up tight.  Evaluate, critique.  Take a half-hour to get your respiration back to normal.  Turn the machine off, and give it a little pat.  Pray, giving thanks, and swearing not to cuss and throw tantrums in the future.

Take a little break.  Some time to reflect on why you bought a big leather stitcher in the first place.  Not to mention the two others your dumb ass ordered to keep the first one company.  Contemplate therapy, then convince yourself that therapy is for sissies.  You got this.

Make more stuff.  And, repeat.

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I’m not a website design guru. But, you already knew that.

ALL NATURAL GUNBELT

I’ve been playing with a few different “themes” for the website.  I’m not real kicked in the head with any of ’em.

It would probably help if I knew what I was doing.

There are hundreds of companies and individuals in destitute third-world countries that are willing to help me out.  I know this because they spam me constantly.

Please bear with me–I’ll figure this out, eventually.  I will.

The belt above is one of my double-layer (dual-layer) bonded and stitched natural Hermann Oak gunbelts.  It’s 1-1/2″ wide, and comes with seven holes spaced 3/4″ apart for adjustment.  I like the look of the seven holes, and the functionality of being able to “fine-tune” the fit.  The stitching is heavy nylon for years of hard use.  The keeper is hand-molded, and hand-sewn…there’s no metal staple hidden behind it to corrode down the road.  The edges are hand-beveled, hand-dyed, hand-burnished, polished and waxed.  I’ve got an unhealthy obsession with stitching and edges.  I’ll never get them perfect, but when they haul my ass away, I’ll still be seeking that perfection.  This one’s topped off with solid, heavy, polished brass hardware and two floral engraved solid brass Chicago screws.

As always…handmade in what’s left of the good ol’ USA.

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Mahogany and black. Pretty fine color combination.

Gibson Mahogany gun belt. 1-1/2" wide, lined Hermann Oak leather. Polished brass hardware.  $125.00 plus shipping.
Gibson Mahogany gun belt. 1-1/2″ wide, lined Hermann Oak leather. Polished brass hardware. $150.00 plus shipping.
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Gibson Gun Belt Star Basket BK and TLF. 1.5″ wide in Natural oil finish with border.

This is one of the most popular of the many hand carved, and hand stamped belt designs we produce around here.  This one is the Star Basket BK in a 1-1/2″ width.  It’s hand cut from a side of premium, American tanned Hermann Oak leather.  Each star basket is hand-stamped, one at a time, the entire length of the belt.  Each tiny half flower making up the border is hand-stamped.  That includes the hand-sewn leather keeper.  Nothing is ever embossed.  (Embossing is used in mass-produced factory products where the design is rolled or pressed into the leather with a machine).

GIBSON STAR BASKET IN PROGRESS DOMAIN-JAN 30 2016
The stamping process. By hand, one at a time. “Old school,” and time consuming. That’s what makes it so cool.

The buckle is solid, polished brass.  This one has two floral engraved brass Chicago screws attaching the buckle.

All edges are hand-finished, hand-waxed, and hand-burnished for visual appeal and to minimize the effects of exposure to the environment.

All of my belts have seven (7) adjustment holes spaced 3/4″ apart.  This is both visually appealing, and functional.  The heavy nylon stitching is recessed into a stitch groove to minimize exposure and wear.

Every belt is finished with 100% pure Neatsfoot oil.  Unlike an imported factory, or department store belt, these take a minimum of three (3) days to produce.

And, yes.  I baby ’em every step of the way.

STAR BASKET BK-NATURAL TWO-PLY LINED-DOMAIN--JAN 30 2016
Gibson Star Basket BK with border. Two-ply, hand-stamped American-tanned, Hermann Oak leather, natural oil finish, with heavy white nylon stitching and polished brass hardware. Made in USA.
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Orders closed. That was quick.

If you were sitting on the fence, I apologize.  If you ordered, I appreciate it.  My backlog/wait-list has reached the limit that I’ve set for myself.  Any longer and I lose sleep, throw up blood, and start trying to work 24-hours a day.  Naw, it’s not really that bad.

GIBSON BLACK N BLACK CHERRY CROSSCUT-DOMAIN--JAN 25 2016
Gibson Crosscut premium Hermann Oak two-ply gun belts. Black, and Black Cherry, 1.5″ wide with solid brass hardware. $199.00 plus shippng.  Made in the USA.

I like to be booked far enough out to circumvent poverty, but not so slammed that I can’t work on other projects.  Some would call me a lightweight.  Hell, my friends call me worse.

I’m blessed to be busy.  Thank you for all the orders.

I’d best get after it!

 

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Workin’ on it.

GIBSON GLOCK 19 23 32 NATURAL SAN CARLOS BORDER

As most of you know, I changed domains and web providers several months ago.  A bunch of you have made inquiries about product availability, pricing, accepting orders, etc.

I’m workin’ on it.

I am not accepting any more advance orders. accepting a very limited number of advance orders.  That’s not intended to be coy–it’s simply to minimize my backlog.  I’ve got a few things in-stock that I’ll be adding in the near future.  If you see something you’re interested in, feel free to send me an e-mail to BruceGibson@aol.com.

There’s a bunch to catch up on.  The fun part’s making it…writing about it?  Not so much.

Thank you for your patience.