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Sam Andrews of Andrews Custom Leather makes a holster with Hank Strange.

It’s a little long, but this is an excellent video done by Hank Strange in Sam Andrews shop down in Alachua, Florida.  This one takes you step-by-step through Sam’s process of making a belt slide, or “pancake” holster for a Glock 19.  Sam recently moved his shop from Alachua to St. Augustine, Florida.

Sam’s process is a little different than mine, but similar in many ways.  He’s been at it for some 40-years, and he stays booked with an extended backlog.  As a Maker, I love watching other Maker’s processes.  I always learn something, and this video is no exception.  One thing I learned from this one is that Sam Andrews seems to be a heck of a nice guy.

Awesome video from Hank Strange on a process I’m always fascinated by.  Check out Andrews Custom Leather here Andrews Custom Leather and Hank’s YouTube Channel here Hank Strange YouTube.

Check it out, and comment below!

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Gibson 1911 Holster. I think it has your name on it. (G6)

This one’s gorgeous.  If you hang around here much, you know I’m a huge fan of the belt slide/pancake holster.  This one was designed from the ground up.  Literally, a sketch on a legal pad.

Details

This one is designed for a 4 or 4.25″ Commander-length barrel.  It’s pictured with a 5″ Kimber Raptor with the muzzle exposed.  I like that look–your mileage may vary.

Full firing grip.

High ride.

Outside the waistband (OWB).

15-Degree rake/cant.

Slots are for a 1.5″ wide dual-layer 1/4″ thick gunbelt.

Premium Hermann Oak American-tanned leather.

Very proudly handmade in the USA.

As always, your satisfaction in guaranteed.

This one is $120.00*, shipped via USPS Priority Mail with Insurance and Delivery Confirmation.  (*Florida orders I’ll send you an invoice for an additional $7.20 for sales tax.)

Questions?  Send me an e-mail to BruceGibson@aol.com

 

 

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Mike Stinnett hand carving a copperhead cane. Incredible.

Awesome video of the making of a Copperhead cane by artist Mike Stinnett in Eastern Oregon.  Amazing what some folks can do with a single, simple piece of wood.  Talent and patience.