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Amazing Sunday morning.

Perfect day in this part of the country.  Nice and quiet, just the way I like it.  Working on a simple little project for an old friend over in Arizona that needed some latigo string for some saddle and chap repair.  Don’t get me wrong–challenging and complicated is always welcome, but simple is a nice change of pace.

It’s a nice break from just doing gunleather.  Mix things up a little, so to speak.  I do have a bunch of holsters I’ll be working on this week.  If you’re in the market, or just curious, feel free to stop back by–I’ll have pictures of the process as they progress.  As long as I don’t forget to drag out the camera.

Hope you’re having a terrific Sunday.

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Saddle stuff, gunleather, and semi-unplugged.

It’s finally cooled off around here and I’ve knocked the dust off a couple of saddle trees.  The gunleather keeps me busy, and as always, thank you to all of my holster and gunbelt customers.

As most of you know, I stopped accepting advance orders about a year ago.  It gives me the opportunity to make the stuff I want to, without the stress of a backlog.  It’s funny how that works–something will “click” with folks, and you get buried in orders for it.  I think you have to have a personality for the “always booked” lifestyle.  It just doesn’t suit me.

I’ll be working on more gear for the 1911, and continue to dress ’em up with florals, oak leaves and acorns.  Probably throw some basket stamping in there.

When I have products available, I’ll be posting them here with the handy little “Buy Now” button.  It’s a win-win…I don’t have a waiting list, and you don’t have a wait.

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Bob Klenda. Colorado leatherworker and saddlemaker.

I’ve never met Mr. Bob Klenda, but over the years I have become well aware of who he is, and I’ve also got several of his patterns, and we’ve talked on the phone.

A two word description?  Nice guy.

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Websites, projects and cluttered benches.

A place for everything, and everything outta place.
A place for everything, and everything outta place.

I’ve heard it said, “there’s a method to the madness.”  Seems appropriate.

It’s been a busy month around here so far, and I’m thankful for it.  If you’ve been here before, you’ve likely noticed a lot of changes.  We’re experimenting with “website themes.”  You may have also noticed that when it comes to technology, I really don’t know what the hell I’m doing.

That hasn’t slowed me down.

Most of what’s posted around here is gunleather in some shape or form.  Today, there are a few holsters, quite a few belts, and a couple of workbench and machinery photos.  Fact is, gunleather’s just a small part of what I do.  It’s fun, and I enjoy it–I carry every day, so it’s near & dear you might say.

Among other things, I also make a little rodeo gear, a lot of livestock, pet and cowboy gear, and there’s a few saddles in various stages of progress.  There’s always something “underway.”  That could mean anything from just-started to damn-near done.  As I figure things out, I’ll post it, or list it, and if you like it, we can make it possible for you to own it.

Thanks for stopping by.  I hope you’ll make it a regular visit.

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Jesse W. Smith. Saddlemaker, artist, legend.

I’ve shared this before, a while back. Just came across it again, and thought I’d share it…again.

Back in May of 1980 I was living in Spokane, Washington. Two things are always at the forefront of my memory of that time. Mount St. Helens blowing her top, and hanging out at Jesse W Smith‘s saddle shop. Jesse built the first bronc saddle I ever owned. He took a Raymond Hulin bareback riggin’ as a down-payment on it, and financed the rest.

Jesse’s a cool dude. Always has been. American military Veteran, teacher, artist. Fact is, in our business he’s a legend. He doesn’t know it, and he’d probably think I was addled for saying it, but it’s true. A quiet, humble, American treasure.

Thank you for the friendship Jesse. Thank you for letting an 18-year old, wanna be bronc rider hang around your shop back in the day. And, thank you for the trust.

Here’s a little video about one of my heroes.